Tag Archives: gangs

Chicago Car Violence Protest

This past Saturday, Rev. “Snuffy” Pfleger (so named for calling for gun store owners to be “snuffed out,” a crime by anyone else) led thousands in a protest of the Interstate highways in Chicago to protest violence. Car violence, one might assume from the location.

You’d be mistaken. They were protesting “gun violence.” And the drug war, for jobs, for free money, and “a plan to improve schools.” I suspect culling the stupid by wandering into expressway traffic will do more to improve schools in the long run, than any formal “plan.”

But, basically, they were protesting “gun violence” by inconveniencing folks who aren’t committing it, in an area where it doesn’t much happen compared to certain, specific neighborhoods. Go figure.

Perhaps they were merely “raising awareness” of gun violence. So they have to bring it to the attention of those not committing it; the criminals already know.

Or maybe they’re cowards.

If Father Snuffy wants to impress me, he should organize a march into the neighborhoods infested by the gangs and drug criminals who are committing the “gun violence” (mostly against each other, their competitors). They can walk arm in arm and protest the Adidas Boys, Black Disciples, Crazy Gangsters, Latin Stones, assorted Vice Lords, and a few dozen other known gangs. Inconvenience those people, Pfleger. If you have the guts.

Go for it, Rev. March into those neighborhoods and call out the armed gangbangers. Threaten to “snuff out” a few of them and see what happens. Experience the violence inherent in the system first hand. You might want to leave your wallet at home.

Ah, but maybe Snuffleupagus doesn’t know where to find them. After all, his fellow marcher Chicago Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson (and why is the PD participating in — endorsing — an unlawful act?) doesn’t seem to be able to locate the bad guys.

Allow me to assist you, Snuffer. Or, more specifically, let ChicagoGangs.org do the cops’ job: names, locations, descriptions. Everything you need to identify the violence-prone neighborhoods and responsible gangs.

Go tell the violent criminals to stop the violence, and let the innocent be.

It’s time for Pfleger to put up, or shut up.


Carl is an unpaid TZP volunteer. If you found this post useful, please consider dropping something in his tip jar. He could use the money, what with truck repairs and recurring bills.

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A Clockwork Future

Recently I saw a column posted a couple of places, one of them was Facebook. The person that posted it happened to be the President of TZP. He commented that the novel A Clockwork Orange was prophetic. Honestly, I had never read the book, not in school and not on my own. So I read the column and then hit the (occasionally) reliable Wikipedia.

As it turns out a Clockwork Orange is a pretty accurate description. The novel is about a gang of boys who love violence and hurting people. They have their own language, called Nadsat a mix of Anglo-Russian. The characters all sounded like we would be much better off if they spent a loooong time in Sheriff Joe Arpio’s custody.

While searching to find out what A Clockwork Orange was about, I ran across a movie review from Roger Ebert. I kind of doubt Ebert is much of a conservative, but I could be wrong. Anyway, the thing that interested me about his review was how he accepted the anti-hero of the movie, Alex. Here’s a couple of excerpts from the review.

I don’t know quite how to explain my disgust at Alex (whom Kubrick likes very much, as his visual style reveals and as we shall see in a moment). Alex is the sort of fearsomely strange person we’ve all run across a few times in our lives — usually when he and we were children, and he was less inclined to conceal his hobbies. He must have been the kind of kid who tore off the wings of flies and ate ants just because that was so disgusting. He was the kid who always seemed to know more about sex than anyone else, too — and especially about how dirty it was.

…..

Now Alex isn’t the kind of sat-upon, working-class anti-hero we got in the angry British movies of the early 1960s. No effort is made to explain his inner workings or take apart his society. Indeed, there’s not much to take apart; both Alex and his society are smart-nose pop-art abstractions. Kubrick hasn’t created a future world in his imagination — he’s created a trendy decor. If we fall for the Kubrick line and say Alex is violent because “society offers him no alternative,” weep, sob, we’re just making excuses.

Interesting. Because how many movies and video games now have a “anti-hero” as the “hero”? To be honest, I don’t really go to movies. There’s not much I want to see, and I loathe to give some left-wing loon money they are going to use to advance a bully pulpit to work against me and the things I believe in. And, lack of time plays a very small part. But here is a review from 1972, and in it the reviewer is condemning the effort to portray a very bad person in a good light, and to make excuses for his behavior. How often do we see that now? Rachel Madcow? Chrissy “Tingly-leg” Matthews and on ad nauseam? What was decried by a liberal in 1972 has become the norm now.

Lt. Col. Dave Grossman has talked about the effect of the games on kids. He has a book out about it, but you can also read about it on his web site. He’s always worth reading or hearing.

So on to the story linked to this. A group of 40-60 teens swarmed a train in Oakland. They took over a car, robbed the passengers and beat a couple of them.

Trost said police arrived at the station in less than 5 minutes, but that the robberies took place in just seconds.

The gang then retreated in the the East Oakland neighborhood before the police arrived. Those security cameras that track us all and are suppose to keep us safer? Yep, they recorded the whole thing. Didn’t stop it of course, but they recorded it. Did BART then release the video so they could catch those responsible? No. In fact, they didn’t even warn passengers or tell them what had happened. Nor did they release the information via Twitter, Facebook or their phone app or…any of the media platforms they have. They did say it was recorded on the police blotter. Oh well, I’m sure everyone checks that before the head to the station. In the past I guess they have released video with the perpetrators faces obscured, since they are juveniles. How that is suppose to help catch anyone I’m rather unsure. But they didn’t even do that. I’m kind of curious why they haven’t. But one thing we can be sure of, since California is determined to be a gun free “sanctuary” state, all the residents of California can feel safe and secure. Yep, safe and secure.

Do I know these people are who committed the crime? Of course not! But here’s what I DO know, they are out there, somewhere. And always remember, when seconds count, no matter how good they are, the police are just minutes away.

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