Tag Archives: Training

How much training? And why?

In ransacking the news for the weekly newsletter, I ran across this letter to the editor which reminded me of a typically ban bunny tactic to make firearms less accessible to honest folk.

Support smart gun laws
On the other hand, I am appalled and always have been by the fact that only one hour of practice is required to get the permit.
[…]
When one picks up a gun and consciously gets a license, it is with the intent to defend yourself, up to and including killing another human being. It is a weapon more intense than an automobile, which requires many more hours of training before someone gets behind the wheel.

When I got my driver license 40 years ago, I had to pass a ten question — as best I recall — written test and a five minute road test. There was no mandatory classroom or road training back then.

My truck has several controls. Steering wheel, shifter, clutch pedal, accelerator pedal, brake pedal, parking brake, headlight switch, hi/lo switch, wiper switch, turn signal switch, dash light dimmer switch, emergency flasher switch. I won’t bother mentioning the rest which don’t relate directly to driving the vehicle safely. But for all that, ten questions and five minutes on the road. Training wasn’t mandated by law, but I undertook that on my own so I’d know how to work all those controls properly. It seemed the sensible thing to do. After all, I’d be operating a device with the kinetic energy of a small bomb while carrying a fuel tank with the chemical energy of a large bomb. Thousands more people die by automobile than by firearm in America.

My usual carry gun has a trigger, magazine release, and a slide lock/release. Note the lack of a steering wheel, because if you can point your finger you can point a pistol.

For that, gun controllers — when they deign to allow us to be armed at all — want us to — just as examples from bills I’ve seen over the years — 1) get a license to purchase a firearm, 2) undergo forty hours of classroom training, 3) sixteen hours of range training, 4) pass a hundred question written test, 5) pass a fifty round range test, 6) get fingerprinted, 7) get photographed, 8) pass a background check, and 9) get a judge’s permission to carry. In some places, not others.

Given the requirements for operating a potential weapon of mass destruction, the requirements for carrying a defensive tool with three controls seems.. a little excessive.

Someone planning to get a gun certainly should get some education and training. I did; some through military and law enforcement sources, and quite a bit more on my own, by my choice.

While I’ve never been a certified instructor, I have informally trained quite a few people. In a couple of hours or less I can get the basic laws regarding carry defensive shooting across to most people of normal intelligence. Then spend another half hour on the “four rules”, familiarization with the new shooter’s specific weapon, sight picture, trigger control (a little dry fire included). I’ve found that when the trainee starts live fire, 50% of them put the first round in center mass. quite a few do the same with the first full magazine. I don’t recall any who missed the silhouette. (As opposed to a law enforcement officer who routinely failed her annual weapons qualification because she couldn’t paper with a shotgun loaded with 00 buckshot at twenty yards. The only time I routinely wore my ballistic vest was when I had to be on the range with her. Another officer tried to buy it from me when he heard she was coming.)

The simple fact is that that defensive handguns are designed to be operated without a huge amount of training.* Clueless “useful idiots” in the gun control camp may not realize that, but their leadership does. The mandates are only intended to restrict honest people’s right to self defense.

Train, yes. Mandated unreasonable, restrictive requirements, no.


* Design is what matters, not mechanical simplicity. A broadsword has no moving parts, the only “control” is the hilt. Yet a new would-be swordfighter might require days or weeks of training before I’d let him armor up fully and engage in a regular full speed bout. Swords are mechanically simple, yet difficult to master. This is why medieval Japan banned firearms; too many highly trained-samurai-backed tax collectors were getting killed by peasants with those newfangled guns.

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poll: best training?

trainingThe first time I’d ever shot any type of firearm was in Army basic training. I knew enough about firearms to know which way to point one. My dad had always kept a gun in the house, but I knew not to play with it, and when I did pick it up a few times, I instinctively kept my finger off the trigger.

In basic, the first thing we did was familiarize ourselves with our M16A2 rifle. They had us take those things apart and put them together so many times, I could have done it in my sleep! It was useful knowledge. By the time we got to the range for the first time, I was so comfortable with that rifle, I could have slept with it.

But we still didn’t fire the thing. We dry fired. A lot. The drill instructors had us put a penny on the front sight, and we practiced pulling the trigger in the prone position so smoothly, that the penny would not fall off. We had to pull that trigger 10 times in a row without the penny falling off the sight. If it fell, we had to start over.

We spent a lot of time in the dirt in the prone position.

The drills worked. I qualified Expert – 39/40 – at the pop-up range at Fort Jackson thanks to the training we received.

So what about you? What training do you find most useful when it comes to firearms?

The choices below are in no particular order, and I’m sure there are scores of others you can name. Choose one, or let us know in the comments what firearms training you find the most useful.

 

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Upcoming Class: Guerrilla Resistance Support Operations

by Kit Perez

A mixed unit that included 7 Jewish partisans.
Photo taken in November, 1943 in Drahichyn, Belarus.
The photo includes members of the Shish branch of
the Molotov Brigade (Otriad Regiment).
(source)
While advocating for gun rights (and hopefully training with your firearms) it’s easy to get caught up in the ‘run and gun’ mentality. We stock up on ammo and spare parts, we dry fire practice, and we spend all kinds of money on gun-related things. While doing all of those (awesome) things, we often miss one of the most critical parts of being a partisan–cultivating the skills and the support infrastructure necessary to be successful.

When you think of the word “patriot group” you probably think of the myriad bands of folks typing away on social media. The word “militia” may conjure up images that aren’t all positive, or at least pretty niche. What they all have in common is guns. The problem is that there is far more to a successful guerrilla movement than guns–or even the skills and will to use them. Understanding how to set up and maintain those networks and infrastructure is the difference between a stagnant movement and a liberty resistance.

World War II resistance cells did a great deal more than ‘run and gun.’ They wrote propaganda pieces in secret and distributed them to millions of people. They engaged in acts of sabotage all over Europe, wreaking havoc on German efforts. They had one of the best-developed intelligence networks imaginable. They forged papers, smuggled supplies and people across borders, and saved countless people destined for the gas chambers. They housed spies and other resistance members, ferried information to the Allies, patched up injuries in makeshift places with no real supplies, and provided a host of other badly needed services.

Not all of them carried a gun. In fact, some of them never did–yet they were every bit as important as those who did. Being a support member was not always glamorous, and yet it was amazingly dangerous. Resistance members paid with their lives over and over. Sophie Scholl, her brother Hans, and their friends gave their lives for simply publishing a secret newsletter that spoke of liberty and the evils of the Third Reich. All of them, regardless of their location or function, had two things in common: They believed in the cause, and they were willing to do whatever they knew how to do, whatever their skillset was, to help.

Being a resistance member is not just carrying a gun. It’s not getting together with your buddies every so often in the woods to practice combat techniques. It’s taking your skillset and finding a way to use it for the cause—or learning new ones.

Thankfully, there are those in the community who can teach us how to do just that.

John Mosby, former Special Operations soldier, author of several must-read books on partisan operations, and well-known expert on a host of guerrilla topics, is teaching a class in Western WA May 3-4. It is a weeknight class spread out over two days, during which you will learn how to set up and maintain the networks and infrastructure needed to successfully operate as a resistance member. This is effective whether you have an established group or are simply an individual trying to create the networks you need.

All participants in this class will be vetted and appropriate security procedures will be followed for obvious reasons. Once you have passed vetting you will be given information for payment, location, etc.

If you want to be more than a Facebook typist—or even a run and gunner—then you need this class. Don’t just be part of a movement. Be part of the resistance.

Email audax0@protonmail.com for more information—don’t miss out!

Don’t be this guy.
 


Ed. note: This commentary appeared first on TZP’s weekly email alert. If you would like to be among the first to see new commentary (as well as to get notice of new polls and recaps of recent posts), please sign up for our alert list. (See sidebar or, if you’re on a mobile device, scroll down). Be sure to respond when you receive your activation email!

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